World Trademark Review 1000 2021

The World’s Leading Trademark Professionals - a unique guide that identifies the top trademark professionals in key jurisdictions around the globe. The WTR 1000 focuses exclusively on trademark practice and has firmly established itself as the definitive ‘go-to’ resource for those seeking world-class legal trademark expertise.

United Kingdom: England

Despite the inevitable complications that the covid-19 crisis has caused to industry at large, Brexit remains the main topic on the minds of UK trademark practitioners. With the country having exited the European Union in January 2020, seismic changes to the way the UK and European trademark communities operate are...

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Despite the inevitable complications that the covid-19 crisis has caused to industry at large, Brexit remains the main topic on the minds of UK trademark practitioners. With the country having exited the European Union in January 2020, seismic changes to the way the UK and European trademark communities operate are anticipated. Whether a deal is reached or not, the UKIPO has arranged for EU trademarks and registered Community designs to be transferred to the UK register at no additional cost to rights holders. However, question marks remain over representation rules in the post-Brexit world, with a July 2020 consultation implying that from 2021, only UK attorneys will be allowed to represent clients in UK trademark, design and patent applications and related contentious proceedings. While this could be a positive development for UK trademark attorney firms, which will now have a monopoly on the still lucrative UK market, the downside is that without an established base in Europe, UK attorneys will no longer have the right to act before the EUIPO. With this in mind, many firms have been setting up shop in locations such as Ireland – a trend that has been unfolding since the referendum result in 2016. Meanwhile, another hot topic is the United Kingdom’s post-Brexit negotiations with the United States, with the latter refusing to countenance a trade deal unless the United Kingdom departs from an EU-friendly geographical indications regime in favour of a more Americanised model. Despite these concerns, combined with covid-19-related setbacks, the United Kingdom is apparently still on track for a banner trademark year – according to figures published by the UKIPO, its income from trademark activity is set to increase by more than £6 million across the 2020-21 period. Filing numbers at the UKIPO have been rising year on year since 2011, with applications reaching a high of 107,527 in 2019.

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