United Kingdom: England

Even in a market as sophisticated as the United Kingdom, awareness of the importance of brands continues to grow – particularly in relation to issues such as plain packaging, copycat packaging and non-agricultural geographical indications. In addition, brand owners are increasingly willing to explore new tools such as comparative advertising regulations and internet blocking injunctions to deal with infringement. The trademark services market has recognised these trends and is evolving accordingly. As clients take a broader view on trademarks, firms are expanding their offerings, with agencies increasingly handling contentious briefs and law firms fielding prosecution and portfolio management requests. However, this does not suit all clients; many still place a premium on specialisation. The issue of pricing looms large over the profession, although for sophisticated brand owners, cost is not the ultimate determinant, but rather expertise. Nonetheless, innovative fee structures and service arrangements are greatly appreciated. Inevitably, Brexit is the hot topic on everyone’s lips – although its ultimate impact on UK trademark practice remains very much to be seen.

Firms

1
Allen & Overy LLP
Baker McKenzie LLP
Bird & Bird LLP
Bristows LLP
Olswang LLP
Taylor Wessing LLP
2
Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
DLA Piper UK LLP
Fieldfisher LLP
Lewis Silkin
Mishcon de Reya LLP
Nabarro LLP
Redd Solicitors LLP
Rouse IP Ltd
Stephenson Harwood
3
Bear & Wolf
Blake Morgan
Browne Jacobson LLP
Burges Salmon LLP
Charles Russell Speechlys LLP
CMS UK
Cooley LLP
Dentons
Fox Williams LLP
Herbert Smith Freehills LLP
Hogan Lovells International LLP
Locke Lord LLP
Pinsent Masons
Powell Gilbert LLP
Reed Smith
RPC
Simmons & Simmons LLP
Squire Patton Boggs (UK) LLP
Allen & Overy LLP
Allen & Overy has transformed its IP practice with the recent hire of several eminent practitioners – including patent and trademark specialists – from Simmons & Simmons. From a branding perspective, the arrival of David Stone has been something of a coup: outstanding on trademarks and “without a shadow of doubt the thought leader on designs in Europe”, he is a “brilliant strategist who takes an aggressive but measured approach”. His soft skills are some of the best in the business, too; commentators call his client service “top drawer” and describe him as “incredibly personable”. He will fit right in, given the firm’s track record on complex IP disputes and transactions. The team that he joins is already stacked with talent. Accomplished litigator Neville Cordell has been a partner here since 2009 and has taken the lead on much of its meatiest trademark-related work. “He is someone who you can rely on to know the answer to anything” and his practice is very diverse. He recently advised Virgin Media and Virgin Enterprises on a high-stakes trademark and comparative advertising dispute with British Telecommunications, and prepared a complaint to the Advertising Standards Authority on behalf of SC Johnson against cleaning product supplier Challs. Jim Ford and Nigel Parker anchor a standout transactions practice. Ford’s management of large-scale rights transfers is flawless;he recently safeguarded the passage of approximately 38,000 IP rights from TE Connectivity to CommScope, which purchased TE’s broadband network services business. Parker has a talent for helping brand owners to expand in their respective markets; a recent demonstration of this came when he acted for Philippines brandy maker Emperador Group on its acquisition of various assets from Beam Suntory, paving the way for a lucrative European business.
Baker McKenzie LLP
“While giving clients a single relationship point, Baker McKenzie has an established capacity to provide multi-jurisdictional solutions and thinking. Its London IP department is, in the trademark area, a market leader for its expertise and innovation. It is very user friendly and shows a willingness to adapt to how you want your external counsel relationship to be.” A dynamic team of over 30 fee earners is headed by Michael Hart, the trusted confidant of many an industry leader. Alongside Jessica Le Gros and Michelle Blunt, he manages the global portfolio of HSBC. Nothing escapes the attention of Le Gros, who heads the trademark group and is a key contact within the context of the firm’s unique global managed services model. She also counts British American Tobacco, Unilever and Dreamworks Animation as clients. Commercial IP specialist Blunt leads the transactional practice and has a sixth sense for keeping track of the intellectual property in orbit around transformative deals; brand disposals and acquisitions for Unilever have been keeping her busy. All five partners on the team make it into the WTR 1000, reflecting the group’s strength in depth. Paul Rawlinson has been integral in turning Baker McKenzie into the global trademark powerhouse that it is today. “He brings long-term strategic insight and a keen feel for what is commercially important to your company.” He has “brilliant negotiation skills” and is “always calm and pragmatic”. Life sciences don Hiroshi Sheraton combines exceptional patent and trademark expertise in his international contentious practice; he also provides invaluable insight at the intersection of IP and competition law.
Bear & Wolf
Bear & Wolf flies under the radar, but its trademark offering is unique and certainly worth a look for brand owners in search of a fresh perspective. “The team has an unconventional way of thinking and performing, which is informal and very business oriented.” Its unstinting commitment to the brand protection cause also wins it many fans. A compact boutique, it nonetheless deftly manages large portfolios – rapid response times instil clients with confidence that their prized intangible assets are in safe hands. Beyond legal work, it can also help to launch, distinguish and protect brands. Simon Tracey and Mark Heritage act for a diverse client roster that includes Agatha Christie Limited, ASSOS and Monster Energy – as well as iconic artists including Lady Gaga, Beyoncé and Kanye West. Tracey makes for a staunch ally who likes to be there in the trenches with clients. His expertise is global and encompasses prosecution, exploitation, litigation and anti-counterfeiting. Heritage gives “solid advice” and has “unbeatable charisma”.
Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
“Berwin Leighton Paisner isn’t a boring, dusty City firm – it lives in today’s world and is right on top of everything in a way that is so refreshing.” It is a pioneer among commercial law firms for its integration of the talents of solicitors and trademark attorneys, and adroitly handles both prosecution and litigation. For further proof of its innovative credentials and willingness to do things a little differently, just look at its new Lawyers On Demand service, which offers in-house professionals a comprehensive menu of choices, allowing them to overcome burdensome costing issues and find the right fit in terms of expertise. The group’s trademark work is cutting edge, too; in one of its biggest recent cases, it successfully defended Frazer-Nash Research and Ecotive against claims that they had infringed the trademark for LTC’s London taxi design by launching a new eco-friendly black cab. In the spotlight on this one, Simon Clark gets a great deal of credit. “Simon has always been a very entrepreneurial thinker and someone unafraid to break new ground – for example, in terms of pricing solutions.” “He is exceptionally bright – you can talk to him about any legal matter, not just intellectual property. Very approachable and easy to deal with, he gets back to you within minutes, even though he is enormously busy. He is a key figure in terms of what is happening in the City.” Clark heads the IP group, while Ian Gruselle takes the reins of the brand management and trademark group. Gruselle makes the task of managing large international portfolios look easy and is thoroughly invested in clients’ worldwide success. He has landed some big fish recently; Danone instructed him to represent it before the UK Intellectual Property Office and the EU Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) in oppositions. Key figures within the data and IP practices Tamara Quinn and Ian De Freitas add further senior-level depth. Quinn inks lucrative IP deals on the daily, while De Freitas effortlessly dispatches data and reputational issues.
Bird & Bird LLP
Bird & Bird has “probably the strongest IP brand in the UK legal services market”. A major storyline has been the striking growth of its prosecution practice, which complements its formidable contentious capabilities superbly. Brand owners large and small, domestic and foreign, find all their routine matters handled efficiently on an international basis, while also taking comfort from the team’s insight on exam-type questions and shrewd strategic guidance. Allan Poulter has been the key to unlocking so much prosecution potential. “He is one of the top counsellors in the United Kingdom in terms of practicality and ability to see the big picture.” “A commercial, no-nonsense guy”, he is “a real expert on European trademark registration”. Together with the “client-focused and practical” Katherine Stephens, he advises Philip Morris International on a variety of branding, regulatory and design issues. Mark Holah added serious firepower to the practice when he joined in 2015. “Among the best trademark lawyers in London, Mark has a great handle on international law – it makes him efficient and cost effective, as he often cuts out your need to go to local lawyers in other countries.” His refined strategies go down a storm with the likes of Fabergé, whose global portfolio he manages, together with complex multi-jurisdictional disputes. Meanwhile, the contentious section keeps humming. Hard-hitting High Court litigation is par for the course for Peter Brownlow and his crew. He and Nick Aries – a new addition to this year’s WTR 1000 – acted for ASSOS in its much-publicised pan-European infringement dispute with ASOS. The two also joined up to secure a win for German pharmaceutical giant Merck in a spat with Merck Sharp & Dohme. “Where there’s big-ticket litigation in the United Kingdom, you’ll find Peter Brownlow.” “Vastly experienced” and an “utter gentleman”, he is a “first-class litigator” and “simply the best trademark solicitor in the business”. Newly minted partner Aries “understands your business” and is “willing to roll up his sleeves and work incredibly hard”. “He is a real team player and great at interacting with barristers and other lawyers outside his firm, as well as his own colleagues. He asks all the right questions and is legally brilliant, too.” Transactional work is yet another forte for the firm, which has franchising virtuoso Mark Abell based in its London office.
Blake Morgan
Blake Morgan’s in-depth understanding of the charities sector sets it apart on the highly competitive UK trademark scene. It strikes a fine balance, representing non-profits in a commercially astute way, but without being heavy handed – a feat that it repeats for its many public sector and higher-education patrons. It acts for a slew of heavyweight corporates too, including the likes of leading online sports retailer Wiggle and cosmetics e-business feelunique. Operating flawlessly across the contentious/non-contentious divide, it has cultivated a well-balanced practice, making it a cost-effective out-of-London destination for one-stop shopping. Jill Bainbridge garners rave reviews for her astute management of the IP group and trademark prosecution unit. Barristers comment that “she has a great feel for litigation” and “knows how it all works”, and praise her “sensible” advice and sweeping IP know-how. “She also has good juniors backing her up” – one of whom is rising star Ben Evans. The dual-qualified solicitor and trademark attorney is “practical, business minded and timely, and represents good value for money”.
Bristows LLP
“You see people’s true colours in highly charged contentious scenarios and Bristows covers itself in glory.” “There is no question about it being the best when it comes to trademark litigation.” In Paul Walsh, the group has a masterful litigator with abundant experience in high-stakes suits and a devoted client following. “His straightforward and plain-speaking style is great – nothing is ever over-engineered or over-complicated – and he presents his advice in a very clear and commercial manner. He is top class in the world of contentious trademark work.” In recent years, he has acted for Cadbury at UK and EU levels to prevent Nestlé’s registration of the shape of the Kit Kat bar; things came to a head in 2016 when the High Court ruled in his client’s favour. By his side on this one was Jeremy Blum, “an excellent up-and-coming partner who applies a business lens to his advice and who really invests in the client relationship”. Disputes group head Theo Savvides has also been battling away on bet-the-farm litigation lately, most notably representing Marks & Spencer in its clash with Interflora. An inspiring leader, “he is particularly good at getting the very best out of his team”. Bristows is “a first-class firm from start to finish” and runs a tight prosecution ship to boot. Paul Jordan brings a hawk’s eye for quality to the development of large UK and international trademark portfolios. Notable recent projects include a global portfolio review for Royal Mail, including its Parcelforce brand. At the same time, he has continued to do great things for McDonald’s and the InterContinental Hotels Group, among many others. “He is very good at creating personal relationships and has a practical way of looking at things – he won’t let you travel in a direction that won’t be beneficial to your business.” Also on hand is transactions guru Laura Anderson, “an extremely proficient licensing practitioner with an excellent understanding of brand commercialisation”.
Browne Jacobson LLP
The future looks bright for Browne Jacobson: it recently recorded one of the highest (non-merger) growth percentages of all UK law firms and bagged the Best Managed National Firm award from the Managing Partners’ Forum. Intellectual property – particularly trademarks – is a central plank of its full-service offering and the young, ambitious and dedicated team has been buzzing this past year. On the contentious front, it acted for the London Taxi Corporation in its spat with Frazer-Nash Research Limited and Ecotive – a multi-layered dispute of significant legal and public interest. On the frontlines was Mark Daniels, an all-round IP litigator who “delivers high-quality work with exceptional cost effectiveness”. Litigation is by no means the only game in town for the dynamic ensemble, which also boasts thriving brand consultation and monetisation practices. Head honcho Declan Cushley is “a real authority in respect of any trademark matter, contentious or non-contentious”. “He has tailored the group to deliver an excellent service, while charging considerably less than many of its competitors.” Peers praise his “commercially focused approach” and “ability to advise on how companies can significantly improve their internal systems”. Artfully blending his advertising, marketing, brand strategy, sponsorship and contracts expertise into the practice, Alex Watt brings an extra dimension to the set. He gets to work on myriad novel briefs; for example, he advises iconic British motorcycle maker Triumph on unique brand activations. Peers think highly of his “excellent management skills”.
Burges Salmon LLP
Burges Salmon garners extensive acclaim from those who know it best. “The entire team is incredibly reliable, works hard and responds quickly and clearly – and has rates that are favourable when compared with their London peers.” “Very user friendly, it doesn’t overcomplicate things, but thinks about the world in the same way as you do.” Contentious and transactional maven Jeremy Dickerson “cuts to the heart of issues and is really commercial” – an approach that he has instilled in the group he manages. Starbucks is one of his many A-list patrons; he handles its trademark portfolio and provides all of its UK clearance guidance, as well as advising it on many a trademark infringement issue arising domestically. The Bristol-based lawyer regularly attracts instructions that might otherwise go to one of London’s top names and recently rolled up his sleeves for Victoria’s Secret to appeal a High Court ruling that it had infringed Thomas Pink’s trademarks. “He keeps himself up to date in more than just a pedestrian way on all breaking cases, which is very helpful indeed.” When it comes to IP transactions of any description, you can always trust the advice and judgement of Helen Scott-Lawler. Most lately, she masterminded a cutting-edge joint venture agreement between the University of Bristol and Bristol City Council to develop an open programmable city. She also continues to represent the RAC on large IP development projects.
Charles Russell Speechlys LLP
With its full-bore trademark service and penetrating insight in ancillary areas such as reputation management, Charles Russell Speechlys is an enticing one-stop shop; it lets nothing slip through the cracks when it comes to protecting brand owners and augmenting their competitive advantage. Intimately familiar with what it takes to make brands tick, it is a go-to for portfolio clean-up and management briefs. At the same time, it can bring serious heat in the courtroom and attracts glowing reviews from top-level barristers in the process. One QC calls Mary Bagnall “absolutely exceptional”, adding: “She is more knowledgeable about trademark law than any other solicitor I know, particularly when it comes to non-traditional marks, and she is extremely careful in the way that she goes through all the documentation. A lot of what she does never hits the court, but that speaks highly of her skills.” On the prosecution end, Institute of Trademark Attorneys president Kate O’Rourke is “firing on all cylinders”. “She gives no-nonsense advice and takes a commercial approach,” and is “incredibly sharp and up to speed on all developments in the law and practice”. Interviewees note that “she always has a smile on her face” and describe her as a delight to work with. The sharp licensing and merchandising savvy of transactional IP lawyer Jennifer Pierce adds another string to the firm’s bow. Pierce has a fine-grained understanding of the key issues at play in the fashion, design and education sectors.
CMS UK
The cross-border capabilities of CMS are a boon for brand owners looking to safeguard and enforce rights globally. Its Central and Eastern European network is especially robust and a mark of distinction from other international players based in the United Kingdom. The ace up its sleeve in London is head of intellectual property Tom Scourfield. Adept at just about everything surrounding the protection, enforcement and commercialisation of brands, the solicitor advocate is nevertheless best known for his contentious nous and ability to pursue infringers through both civil and criminal channels. Foreign associates describe him as “reliable and consistent, quality focused, diligent and committed”, as well as “friendly and down to earth”.
Cooley LLP
Cooley takes a bow in the WTR 1000 UK listings for the first time this year. Nick Bolter has built something special in the form of an integrated prosecution and litigation practice which is perfectly geared up to cater to the European needs of US patrons. Leading from the front, Bolter has drilled his team to be super-responsive and step inside the shoes of clients in order to understand their business. One blue-chip calls him “an elite member of our outside counsel ‘inner circle’” and a “creative problem solver who provides timely, commercial and practical advice”. For foreign associates, he is “a true leader within the UK trademark bar” who “commands the respect of some of the world’s most sophisticated brands”. He is always on the grind for Amazon and its affiliates – including Amazon Studios, which he recently advised on title selection for television shows. He has also been busy with Timberland of late, assisting it with a three-dimensional and colour EU trademark application for the shape of its wheat-yellow six-inch boot. An avid car enthusiast, he is in his element acting for Tesla Motors.
Dentons
The very definition of a global firm, Dentons is always making shrewd new moves; in 2016 it made its first incursion into Latin America through a merger with Colombia’s Cárdenas & Cárdenas. Intellectual property figures prominently in its expansion plans – its new Colombian partner, for example, is gold ranked in this year’s WTR 1000. Back in London, John Linneker anchors “an excellent group of talented individuals”. He can be counted on for “very insightful and intelligent advice”. Contentious work in any form is his forte, but he also wins plaudits for his domain name and cybersquatting expertise.
DLA Piper UK LLP
A centrepiece of DLA Piper’s global IP group, the copper-bottomed UK trademark team is a pivot for many a key client with intercontinental branding needs. It recently further bolstered its outstanding portfolio of patrons in the food and beverage sector, landing a household name brewery. It is also an astute recruiter, – most notably hiring WTR 1000 debutant Désirée Fields just under two years ago. The “approachable and efficient” brand protection specialist earns commendations for coordinating global clearance searches and filings “with a commercial and pragmatic approach”, and has augmented a growing UK and EU prosecution team. On the contentious front, the team continues to do great things. Ruth Hoy has been enforcing the rights of Hermes International; John Wilks has been charting a steady course for Callaway Golf through various tricky opposition proceedings; while Chris Tulley – together with Hoy and Wilks – has acted for Avon on oppositions. “Ruth and her team recognise what your business needs are and adapt their approach accordingly. She demonstrates exceptional knowledge and is efficient, and she really looks after junior lawyers.” “John Wilks is extremely thorough and gives clear and sensible advice. He is a pleasure to work with.” Leeds-based Tulley employs a deft touch on brand protection, exploitation and enforcement briefs; he is a Swiss Army knife of a trademark lawyer who can get you through any scrape. Embodying the firm’s commitment to intellectual property, media and IP authority Simon Levine holds the title of global co-cheif executive officer.
Fieldfisher LLP
Fieldfisher has the size, resources and multi-jurisdictional expertise to safeguard prestigious brands, which is why it continues to bring heavyweights on board; it recently won a competitive tender to advise Dixons Carphone, for example. It also has the full-scope prosecution, litigation and transactional capabilities that marquee brand owners are looking for. One client enthuses: “The firm can bring structure to your IP portfolio and direct overall strategy at an international level, while dealing with any infringement actions. It really understands business and what is – and isn’t – important from that perspective.” “One of the most professional people you could hope to work with”, Leighton Cassidy “understands all the issues surrounding trademark law in an international complex, as well as the complexities of dealing with multinationals and their specific needs”. He heads up a “deep, proactive and responsive team” which is “incredibly dialled in on the key issues, such that not even the smallest detail gets past it”. One member making a name for himself is Hastings Guise, who “brings to the table a very detailed analysis of any situation” and “an ability to frame his strategic advice around a business understanding”. Dual qualified as a solicitor and trademark attorney, he maintains a broad practice, although most of his work involves disputes of one kind or another. Captaining the IP and technology dispute resolution group, Nick Rose is a smart choice on any high-stakes spat, given his “wonderfully nimble mind”. “He puts clients at ease and is comfortable imparting difficult advice.” He has lately been acting for Karen Millen Fashions in a widely covered international case against individual Karen Denise Millen concerning the rights in the KAREN MILLEN marks outside Europe. Transactional matters are overseen by franchising and licensing guru David Bond – a man you can trust to successfully handle any strategically significant expansion.
Fox Williams LLP
The compact size of the Fox Williams trademark unit works to its advantage in terms of leanness, flexibility and cost effectiveness, while wide-ranging expertise ensures that it punches significantly above its weight. An intuitive understanding of branding in the fashion industry sets it apart from the pack; founding partner and WTR 1000 newcomer Stephen Sidkin heads the commercial and technology department and is the key contact point for clients in the sector, particularly when it comes to agency, supply, franchising and licensing agreements. IP group leader Simon Bennett likewise caters ably to the brand protection and enforcement needs of fashion companies. “The support and level of service that Simon and his team offer are outstanding. He provides sound, practical advice and is highly dependable. His sense of urgency and comprehensive approach make him a great fit, and having him on side gives you peace of mind.” With a reputation for telling it like it is, he is widely appreciated for being straight with clients. Wragge Lawrence Graham’s merger with Gowlings brings a new international IP titan to the UK market; the former supplied the European and Asian firepower, while the latter brought dominance of the Canadian and Russian markets. The combined entity has also since made strategic inroads in the Middle East, hiring gifted trademark lawyer Jon Parker to spearhead expansion in Dubai. It does no trademark filing in Europe, leaving it free to throw its full weight into must-win litigation in the region. Its crack contentious squad includes “fantastic” Gordon Harris and Alexandra Brodie, as well as Kate Swaine and Cerryg Jones. They work well as a team, but each garners excellent individual feedback. London’s Gordon Harris “has brilliant ideas on strategy”, which he executes smartly in hotly contested disputes. “Extremely sensible and constructive” technology sector group chair Brodie has proved her mettle in crucial patent and trademark disputes. Swaine “gives you a straight answer to your questions and is highly knowledgeable, effective, proactive, practical and commercial”. Keeping clients out of court is a badge of honour for the UK trademark team leader, who has the magic touch coordinating global enforcement programmes. “Cerryg Jones puts his heart and soul into his work and is a consummate expert who really cares for his clients.” Like Swaine, he is a master of risk management.
Herbert Smith Freehills LLP
While Herbert Smith handles prosecution through its Australian offices, its UK IP team is nonetheless in the thick of things when it comes to strategic counselling. Always at the cutting edge in the branding space, it is currently advising British American Tobacco on the proposed UK and EU plain packaging measures. However, the practice is disputes driven and “a go-to for high-profile litigation”. Referring trademark attorneys call it “head and shoulders above others in terms of litigation expertise and reliability”, adding: “If you want the job done well with the minimum of fuss, don’t hesitate to go there.” Trademarks head Joel Smith is a repository of trust for marquee brand owners, thanks to his suave handling of fraught High Court and Court of Appeal cases and all-encompassing brand management expertise. Mark Shillito is another respected senior figure; he leads the global IP group and the UK and US dispute resolution practices.
Hogan Lovells International LLP
The London IP team is a vital cog in Hogan Lovells’ slick global trademark machine. The firm plays in the major leagues and handles multi-jurisdictional disputes for household names with utmost poise, as its track record attests. Prosecution needs are also well served; in particular, its Alicante office keeps it at the vanguard of trademark protection practice at the EUIPO. Charlie Winckworth and Sahira Khwaja are leading lights in the UK capital. “Charlie has strong business acumen and responds quickly. Of particular value is his practicality and willingness to be creative in finding solutions to advance a matter.” He advises eBay and PayPal on contentious and prosecution matters, working in conjunction with the Silicon Valley team which has primary responsibility for running the client’s global portfolio. He also assists “die weltmarke mit den 3 streifen” with brand enforcement. Khwaja is “a highly experienced counsellor in relation to the non-contentious aspects of brands, including licensing and franchising”. She takes care of a range of UK protection matters for Mars and Wrigley.
Lewis Silkin
Contrasting sharply with most City set-ups, Lewis Silkin has a sophisticated trademark prosecution operation to complement its high-flying litigation practice. It also boasts a vibrant commercial and transactional IP service, making it a reliable one-stop shop. On all fronts, it has been going gangbusters this year. The prosecution unit delivers the crispest search results around and runs immaculate worldwide filing programmes – at all times it is alive to risk and wins plaudits for its crystal-clear, on-point assessments of exposure. Finely tuned designs expertise gives the group another edge. Dominic Farnsworth brings exemplary leadership to the trademark group and is the complete package in terms of his designs, trademarks, media, advertising and sports know-how. Formerly Gillette’s in-house counsel, Steven Jennings has “enormous industry experience” and “a great feel for what big clients require and how they work”. “He is very effective at what he does.” On the contentious front, Simon Chapman is a regular fixture in signature cases. The dispute resolution group leader recently defended House of Fraser in its tussle with Jack Wills; although Jack Wills won on liability for trademark infringement, Chapman got a favourable judgment in respect of accounts of profits which will sound a note of caution for claimants in terms of what is recoverable in such cases. “Pragmatic and highly organised”, he is “a hard opponent to fight on a sophisticated litigation team”. Management board member Giles Crown is an all-round trademark, media, marketing and advertising maven. He has a passion for IP work – particularly brand-related instructions – and has played a leading role in a number of benchmark battles.
Locke Lord LLP
Locke Lord debuts in the UK listings this year as a compelling offering for clients seeking transatlantic trademark capabilities. The London team is captained by “trademark law senior statesman” John Olsen, a “practical and highly efficient lawyer” with “unmatched legal knowledge”. Clients love him for his diverse expertise, but also because “he takes the work personally, almost as if he owns the marks he is protecting”. “He is such a positive person to work with and is approachable and easy to get on the phone to.” Also, “like any great litigator, he can be a bulldog when you need him to be”. He acts for many blue-chips – including MasterCard, whose famous circles logo he tirelessly enforces in Europe.

The trademark enforcers at Marks & Clerk Solicitors swing hard and connect, scoring great results for a prominent domestic and international client base. Working in close association with Marks & Clerk Attorneys, the team is well positioned to advise on intellectual property in a broad strategic way and, as a result, can often help companies to avoid costly litigation. Close proximity and day-to-day contact characterise the relationships that Kirsten Gilbert forges with clients. The seasoned High Court litigator and trademark team head is much appreciated for her creative enforcement strategies and team-oriented approach.

Mishcon de Reya LLP
Mishcon de Reya stands out as one of the key movers and shakers in intellectual property right now; in Spring 2016 it brought on David Rose from King & Wood Mallesons, having also recruited Ray Black from the same firm just under a year before. While Rose brings world-class life sciences and patent expertise to the set, he also offers plenty of trademark know-how: he is top of the class among those crossing the divide between the two practice areas. One source calls him “the best technical lawyer I know”; it is clear that Mishcon de Reya chose well. Black is also outstanding – “just so smart, commercial and sensible”. “He always focuses on the goal and not simply the procedure, and it’s a joy to have him look after you.” They join a platform that was already thriving under the stewardship of anti-counterfeiting and enforcement doyen Jeremy Hertzog and IP protection and exploitation maven Sally Britton. Hertzog acts for BMW and Daimler, alongside other car manufacturers, to crack down on shady operations selling replica wheels and abusing their trademarks. He is no stranger to more classic competitor-based infringement litigation, though, and acted for Jack Wills in its scrap with House of Fraser. Britton is the brains behind a growing non-contentious practice. Maintaining this within the environment of a large full-service firm is challenging, but she has set it up the right way; it isn’t a mere filing factory, but rather focuses on demanding, high-value strategic work. She has lately been advising Tottenham Hotspur on the management of its international IP portfolio and safeguarding award-winning fashion brand Charlotte Olympia.
Nabarro LLP
Nabarro is “a trusted partner which is committed to solving your legal – and business – problems. It brings all the lawyerly expertise you need to bear, but never loses sight of the practical objective”. “Strong litigation and negotiation skills” and an “ability to partner effectively with clients on IP management strategy” give it a holistic perspective on branding matters, which is further enhanced by seamless teamwork among its close-knit partners and associates. The practice has cultivated a roster of highly sophisticated patrons; household names – particularly those from the United States – frequently rely on it for European issues that arise. Hawk-eyed trouble-shooter Guy Heath is often the individual they seek out. The versatile lawyer is gold rated on strategy and recommended for enforcement and litigation, and comes in for considerable praise from a diverse range of sources. “He is superb at developing meaningful, impactful enforcement strategies for marks that are difficult to police.” “Brilliant technically”, he is a “straightforward and sensible lawyer who is easy to deal with”. Examples of his work include overseeing infringement matters for Oracle in Europe and handling disputes for Levi Strauss. David Parrish, who debuts in the WTR 1000 this year, often works in tandem with Heath, but also takes the lead on weighty cases. “David is very switched on and intelligent, and is a personable guy with a great sense of humour who can build rapport. He delivers advice that is neatly packaged and easily implementable.” The resident non-contentious specialist is Louise Gellman, a savvy prosecutor with a busy opposition practice at home and abroad. “She is a tenacious lawyer who serves well with her commercial and pragmatic approach. She is an excellent communicator regarding client tasks, deadlines and strategy.” All members of the group gain a great deal of support from Ian Lowe, a consultant with nearly four decades of IP experience on his résumé.
Olswang LLP
Combining closely integrated prosecution and contentious offerings, Olswang fields a go-to team for any trademark matter under the sun. It is telling that three of the four partners listed in the guide appear on more than one table – with two of them featuring on all three. The group’s knowledge of business and branding concerns in the telecommunications, media, technology, fashion and retail sectors is comprehensive, enabling it to provide a bespoke service. Joel Barry is one of the market’s big dogs, “but he doesn’t let ego get in the way anything – he is committed to doing a fabulous job for clients”. “Bright, pragmatic, user friendly and sensible”, he is a vital asset to any brand owner. So too is Helen Newman, a touchstone for those in the business of luxury: “She knows what drives the industry like nobody else.” Joining them in the WTR 1000 this year is head of trademarks Sarah Wright, a shrewd filing strategist and international portfolio developer par excellence. Though busy as the firm’s chief executive officer, Paul Stevens is an influential figure who operates at the confluence of technology, media and intellectual property.
Pinsent Masons
Intellectual property is a practice that Pinsent Masons takes seriously – the dedicated team is no mere icing on the cake, but is instead driving business to other departments. When rights holders are litigating to push the status quo and really change markets, they engage this group on the frontlines. It has a tried-and-tested ability to negotiate companies out of the tightest corners – on either side of the ‘v’ – and secure results that make business sense. Iain Connor “thrives in the cut and thrust of litigation and is a determined guy – he sticks to his guns and has been proven right in key situations. A down-to-earth and genuine guy who never fronts, he is great with clients and really knows his stuff”.
Powell Gilbert LLP
“London’s leading IP boutique”, Powell Gilbert is “the ultimate in patent litigation” – one of only three firms to be gold rated in sister publication the IAM Patent 1000 – but it also presents a compelling trademark offering which, following new hires and promotions, has only gotten stronger this past year. It typically acts for large companies that put brands at the centre of their universe, including Procter & Gamble. The consumer products multinational has instructed it on a host of important matters, including actions against counterfeiters and parallel traders. Simon Ayrton and his crew also went out to bat for the company in a precedent-setting case concerning third-party interference with the packaging of goods. Clients rave: “Simon is the perfect trademark lawyer. He provides outstanding legal advice and finds the best routes to take in complicated situations. He has a firm grasp of the commercial angle of his cases and is also committed to getting results on a cost-effective basis.” Foreign associates call him a “shrewd trademark litigator who is fast, excellent with the details and impeccable in his analysis”.
Redd Solicitors LLP
“Redd is doing great things and has carved a niche for itself as a top boutique in the trademark space, with a very vibrant practice.” Commentators admire its “holistic brand expertise”; there is nothing that it cannot handle. The growth of its portfolio management service – launched in Spring 2014 – has been a developing plotline. Many brand owners are moving away from agencies to law firms for clearance advice and prosecution, and Redd has been a major beneficiary; knowing exactly what to do when companies get into hot water, it can mitigate contentious risk from the get-go very effectively. Fashion, technology and media expert Emmy Hunt is a key contact for portfolio management and registry disputes. However, Redd remains best known for its contentious prowess. “Anna Carboni brings advocacy experience from the Bar into private practice” and is a “super-smart” top talent who provides “to-the-point advice”. “She is extremely well recognised in the profession for her great expertise.” “Sensible, business-minded and a pleasure to deal with”, Sara Ashby is another star litigator who “fights hard for her clients”. In Simon Chalkley, the firm also has a “true commercial IP lawyer”; when it comes to brands, “there is no question that he is genuinely superb”. “He is immensely likeable and has a light touch, but his strongest point is his understanding of business.”
Reed Smith
Reed Smith is a titan of the media world, which colours its trademark practice to a large (although by no means complete) degree. A big win for Rihanna in her headline-grabbing dispute with Arcadia put it in the limelight and the litigation-focused group has since built significantly on this success. Notable projects in the past year included acting for leading internet service providers in applications for website blocking on the basis of trademark infringement – work which is both topical and technically complex. At the helm of the group is “living legend” Michael Skrein: “He will find a little nugget that nobody else will have found and exploit it to its fullest potential – he really gets under the skin of a case and that is how he often wins. He is a litigator who you bring out for a really high-profile, sensitive and difficult issue.” He and Carolyn Pepper are “both brilliant”. “Carolyn is someone to keep on speed dial. She has a very commercial outlook and provides first-class advice and good out-of-the-box ideas. She gets the tone right – she knows the media industry and the people in it.” Emma Lenthall is also enthusiastically endorsed. Barristers like working with her, because “she always remains calm and sensible”. She recently demonstrated her fleetness of foot responding to UK Border Force notifications regarding possible infringement of the trademarks of client Beauté Prestige International, bringing about a successful outcome for limited spend.
Rouse IP Ltd
Rouse is a “massive name in intellectual property”, particularly in Asia. Wherever you engage it, you can be sure that its team of “experienced and effective lawyers and investigators” will “get results”. The WTR 1000-listed partners all wear different hats, but collectively provide one of the most well-rounded brand protection services on the market. In international enforcement – the firm’s strongest suit – there are few better than Jeremy Newman and Stuart Adams. Newman is a “positive, personable external partner with an acute awareness of clients’ business perspective”. “He is not just a commercial thinker – he understands the pressures that in-house counsel face and their need to influence and report upwards to senior management.” “His can-do attitude is refreshing and reassuring and, above all, he delivers the goods.” The head of Rouse Legal and UK country manager plays a key role in the global enforcement of Sony Mobile’s trademark and designs, and runs Reckitt Benckiser’s worldwide anti-counterfeiting programme. Adams is the head of global dispute resolution and guides the Russia office with a steady hand. Arty Rajendra takes charge of litigation in the High Court and IP Enterprise Court and has had a busy year handling matters for the likes of Harley-Davidson and Ford Motor Company. She is a versatile IP litigator with eye-catching patent, trademark and copyright wins on her CV. Unlike most other contentious and enforcement heavyweights, Rouse provides an A-to-Z trademark management service and has been doing so for many years under the assured direction of Mark Foreman. “Mark understands his clients and their priorities”, and ensures that the customer service is on point, too; “responses from the team are swift and work is undertaken at the appropriate level and price point.” He manages portfolios for Astellas Pharma Europe, Elizabeth Arden, Fred Perry and many others.
RPC
Full-service RPC draws on an enviable wealth of trademark expertise, to superb effect. Unlike some competitors, it has intentionally steered clear of prosecution – instead working in close harmony with trusted external agents – which frees it up to focus on what it does best: resolving disputes and providing strategic IP guidance. This year, the group continued shoring up support in its core areas of luxury, retail and media. Among other things, it successfully litigated for champagne house Louis Roederer regarding infringement of its prestigious Cristal brand; advised Selfridges on the management of its global trademark portfolio; and masterminded trademark infringement and passing-off actions for British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Sources point out that there is talent here up and down the ranks, “which allows for cost effectiveness and efficiency”. However, this would not work without strong command, which is supplied in abundance by Jeremy Drew. “He is a great leader who trusts in his team, while also making sure everything is done properly and on time. He manages budgets by assigning specific tasks to the right person. His approach to litigation is practical and effective, and he seeks results that work beyond the law.” International litigator and deal maker extraordinaire David Cran is another lawyer who is always adding commercial value. Paul Joseph has had a lot going on across both sides of the contentious/non-contentious divide, but through hard work and dedication, keeps everyone happy; in addition to the BBC brief, he has been managing the portfolio of Dreams and advising Japan Tobacco on the reorganisation of its multi-jurisdictional intra-group licensing arrangements. An open, collaborative approach sees the partners riff off each other to great effect, effectively giving clients a three-for-one deal.
Simmons & Simmons LLP
Simmons & Simmons has had a tough time of it lately, losing several IP partners to Allen & Overy – including leading trademark and designs expert David Stone. What moves it will make to bounce back remain to be seen; however, it still has real trademark talent in London in the form of Adrian Smith and Michael Gavey. Smith is “an extremely efficient lawyer with a no-nonsense attitude who gives clear, quick and to-the-point advice”. He focuses on contentious matters, but also adeptly shepherds IP transactions to successful close. Deal making is the bailiwick of Gavey, who heads the firm’s UK life sciences practice.
Squire Patton Boggs (UK) LLP
Squire Patton Boggs has an international trademark platform like few others, which brings together groups spanning the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and Asia. Close collaboration across offices means that clients such as Clarks have all the resources they need at their disposal; the international shoe maker and retailer has instructed the firm on the management of its large trademark portfolio and works with partners in London, Hong Kong and San Francisco in this regard. Hobbs is another patron that benefits from this transatlantic alliance. Florian Traub is the main man in London: “His advice is pragmatic, business friendly and prompt, and he obviously has a strong foundation in all technical aspects of the law. His eye for detail is incredibly keen and he has a broad and deep understanding of trademarks in a retail environment. He knows how to get successful results quickly and works well with other consultants, both in and outside his firm.” His practice runs the gamut from pre-filing search and clearance to high-stakes trademark infringement actions – he acted for Europcar in its dispute with Enterprise Holdings.
Stephenson Harwood
Stephenson Harwood may make less noise on the market than others – at least within its peer group – but its three partners garner some of the warmest client feedback of any lawyers in the country. Newly minted partner Robert Jacob – who debuts in the listings this year – is “a measured lawyer and, unusually for his young age, completely unflappable”; “he brings great strength and depth to the practice”. The Imperial College chemistry grad hammers out favourable results in trademark disputes for pharmaceutical and life sciences concerns; convincing the EUIPO of the distinctiveness of the shape of GlaxoSmithKline’s inhalers was just one recent success. “One of the best litigators around”, Alexandra Pygall is “very tenacious and has a great ability to present complex issues in a simple, clear and concise way, which helps you to make informed business decisions”. “Her availability, responsiveness and calm, friendly demeanour make her very easy to work with and recommend to others.” She advises Moët Hennessy on counterfeiting issues for several of its key brands and sources observe that “she is quietly building a strong luxury practice”. However, “it is the leadership of Eifion Morris that has made Stephenson Harwood a major player in the London IP market”. A foreign associate calls him “without doubt the top trademark litigator in the United Kingdom”; a colleague closer to home labels him an “outstanding strategist”; and a client hails him as “genuinely the best”. “Excellent at multi-tasking on complex cross-border litigation and a creative, business-oriented, precise lawyer, he is a formidable leader of a great group.” Few firms outside the London bubble have the IP expertise of Guildford set-up Stevens & Bolton. The lawyers here have City training and sophistication, but work at much lower rates, making the group an attractive option for those seeking quality representation and bang for their buck. It doesn’t file trademarks, but does get stuck into tricky administrative disputes; in particular, it has had a busy year on the opposition front representing dynamic companies such as Vulpine Performance Limited. The high-end cycling brand falls under the purview of head of intellectual property Tom Lingard, who appears in the guide for the first time this year. He keeps his cool when matters get heated, which is good news for clients such as Future Publishing; the leading UK media company has benefited from his shrewd advice in connection with a long-running dispute over the title of its award-winning video game magazine EDGE. The firm also has a top franchising expert on deck in the form of Nicola Broadhurst, a “focused, confident lawyer” who is considered a thought leader on transactional IP matters.
Taylor Wessing LLP
Taylor Wessing’s deep bench of brand experts in London, seasoned groups in Europe and extensive capabilities in Asia make it one of the most commercially sophisticated international players in the trademark arena. It operates dexterously across the contentious/non-contentious divide and, as well as managing over 45,000 live marks globally – and 5,000 designs – it regularly occupies frontline roles in landscape-altering litigation. Peers remark with admiration that “it has had a lot of new client wins recently – including some which are not easy to land”, but has also “done well to further develop its well-established relationships”. A magnet for complex instructions and effusive praise, Roland Mallinson continues to stand tall on the international trademark stage. “He is very clever and clearly a deep thinker about trademark law. He isn’t someone who fights on every point or plays the man, not the ball, but has a refreshingly measured approach.” He is recommended for litigation and prosecution and strategy; as are others here, including Charles Lloyd and Jason Rawkins. Lloyd is a coast-to-coast adviser with deep expertise in counterfeiting and parallel imports. Rawkins is known for his “really nice, understated style”, which goes down particularly well among the fashion and luxury goods crowd. The eminently versatile practitioner can provide high-level strategic advice, manage a portfolio, negotiate a deal and litigate a case all in one go – and with exceptional perspicacity. Other practitioners with broad horizons include head of UK technology, media and telecommunications Mark Owen, who provides “intelligent, timely and pragmatic contentious advice”; while senior counsel Christopher Benson has “bags of experience and is always on top of everything”. Benson has “an instinctual feel for how things are going to go with the trademark registry”. Showcasing a high degree of specialisation in brand management, France Delord is also recommended. The “bright and personable” solicitor, avocat and French trademark attorney advises Godiva Chocolatier on brand protection strategy and is brought in on the ground floor to strategise on the adoption and development of new brands globally.

Agencies

Agencies

Highly recommended
98
Boult Wade Tennant
Cleveland
D Young & Co LLP
Keltie LLP
Kilburn & Strode LLP
Stobbs IP Limited
Recommended
H
AA Thornton & Co
Dehns
EIP
Gill Jennings & Every LLP
HGF Ltd
Lane IP
Maucher Jenkins
Mewburn Ellis LLP
Murgitroyd & Company
Reddie & Grose LLP
Sipara Ltd
Venner Shipley LLP
Withers & Rogers
AA Thornton & Co

AA Thornton & Co’s seasoned trademark attorneys execute with precision on the registration of UK, EU and international trademarks through the Madrid system. Avoiding tunnel vision on the filing side, it also provides strategically astute guidance across the gamut of prosecution and ongoing portfolio management. The “practical, commercially oriented advice” dispensed by Vanessa Lawrence is a compelling reason to come here. Combining international savvy and incisive sectoral knowledge – concerning fashion, food and telecommunications in particular – with across-the-board contentious and non-contentious proficiency, Lawrence is ready for any brief that crosses her desk. Ian Gill is as technically accomplished as they come and, as partnership chair, has done a fantastic job keeping the firm at the cutting edge in terms of its IT infrastructure and processes. Able to hit on the right approach in no time at all, he performs all tasks with rare efficiency.

“Just fantastic” and “a first-class outfit”, is the verdict on Barker Brettell, a firm of “approachable, pragmatic people with sharp commercial understanding” who “can be counted on to do what is in your best interests”. Bread-and-butter prosecution is adroitly handled by the technically sophisticated team, but there is so much more for patrons to benefit from, including the robust policing and enforcement of marks and far-sighted strategic counselling. Creativity characterises the set’s solutions, whatever obstacles are in the way. A top QC describes Sarah Lait, Catherine Wiseman and Tracy Arch as “sensible, to-the-point advisers who know exactly what they are talking about – and who can be pretty hard-nosed when circumstances require”. Providing strong leadership to what is one of the country’s largest trademark teams, Lait has holistic branding expertise and manoeuvres deftly across the trademark spectrum. She is a thought leader on branding in the university sector. “Incisive expert” Wiseman “is superb at explaining complicated trademark issues to non-experts”. “Reliable, professional, accurate and excellent value for money”, she garners extensive acclaim. Arch stands out as a connoisseur of trademarks in the food and beverage industry. “She has got all the knowledge you need and pays great attention to strategic detail. Incredibly responsive, she will always come back to you with a solution and never fails to go the extra mile.”
Boult Wade Tennant
“A lot of firms doing prosecution are on auto-pilot, but that is never the case with Boult Wade Tennant. It thinks about things strategically and finds solutions that are creative, but sensible and practical, too.” “The group is flexible and innovative when it comes to billing and has a brilliant online digital management system that you can plug into, making the day-to-day management of your portfolio much easier. On top of it all, the advice given is always very commercial.” Consistently performing at the highest level of the profession, all six of its partners make the WTR 1000 grade. Not just filers, they are trusted advisers who think internationally and can see through disputes from beginning to end. Keeping the set in the quality-first groove is managing partner and head of trademarks and domains John Wallace. Brands guru Tony Pluckrose and former Institute of Trademark Attorneys president Catherine Wolfe are two of the best-known pros here. Of Pluckrose, a foreign correspondent comments: “He is the best practitioner I know outside my own jurisdiction – he is extremely client focused.” Another lauds him as “brilliant with UK and EU trademarks”. Wolfe “has an intelligence that is hard to match” and “knows the law and the practice inside out”. In addition, “she has a better understanding of the Chinese market than most other UK attorneys”. Emma Pitcher knows the Indian market just as well; she stays so close to her clients and has such broad expertise that she is practically a trademark concierge, able to assist with anything brand-related and beyond. She often works together with Charlotte Duly and “they make a great team”. Both are “astute, technically excellent, well connected and display a high degree of commerciality”. Also recommended is “simply amazing” Felicity Hide. “She has a super intellect and is excellent on case law, but is also pragmatic and client facing.” She blends domain name registration and dispute resolution know-how into her internationally oriented portfolio management practice. The trademark team at Carpmaels has always been potent in the contentious arena – although not necessarily on steps of the courthouse – but things are different now that ace litigators Jonathan Day and Ian Kirby have hit their full stride since switching over from Arnold & Porter just over two years ago. They are regularly engaged in thorny High Court action and, showcasing the firm’s hard and soft IP strength, recently defended Crawford Healthcare in patent and trademark infringement proceedings brought by Activa Healthcare and other companies. They frequently deploy their broad knowledge of EU and international law in litigation, making them a safe bet for any multi-jurisdictional dispute. “Knowing the law, providing practical advice, being very responsive and working efficiently to obtain results”, Day “treats you as if you’re his most important client”. Kirby knows how to motivate his team in the best way and leads the dispute resolution group with verve. The outfit’s traditional trademark offering continues to impress, too. WTR 1000 newcomer Roger Lush “manages to combine the best of practical and forward-thinking advice with a real focus on his clients. He can be relied on completely to guide you safely across the global IP challenges that you face – he listens to your needs and knows how to make your life easier. In a time-consuming area of business, he keeps it simple in a way that is very effective.” Former trademark group leader and managing partner Keith Howick remains on board as a consultant; his wisdom he brings to the table is a boon.
Cleveland
Cleveland’s trademark practice is incredibly buoyant, with new work and direct clients coming on stream daily. A lot of it relates to complex contentious matters – which are deftly handled by several qualified trademark and design litigators – rather than routine filings. However, prosecution remains an integral part of its operations. It is a remarkably popular option for brand owners, not least because of its strength in depth; six individuals feature in the WTR 1000 this year, including a gold-tier member and two debutants. “A straightforward guy you can just pick up the phone and talk to” and a “fabulous practitioner with significant experience”, Jonathan Clegg enters the top bracket for 2017. A portfolio architect extraordinaire, he also handles oppositions and appeals and negotiates IP agreements with utmost proficiency at an international level. His encyclopaedic know-how was recently capitalised on by the London Bridge Hotel, for which he registered key logo and word marks which were then successfully enforced against another hotel. Imogen Wiseman is also much respected in the wider market. The “practical, responsive and detail-oriented” partner is “commercially astute and really personable”. “She enjoys a good relationship with the UK and EU IP offices and is extremely on top of any and all developments in their approach.” Rounding out the three-partner group is Lorna Hobbs. International companies find her “brilliant at joining the dots between UK and US businesses and adapting strategies as appropriate”. “Her diligence, pragmatism and business acumen contribute greatly to creating better protection, understanding, management and efficiency across an international portfolio. The depth of her experience is obvious and she and her team provide an outstanding standard of service.” Joanna Larkey, Louise Westbury and Peter Houlihan are key names on one of the best associate teams in the business. Praise for Houlihan this year was particularly effusive. One client enthused: “The pride he takes in his work has allowed our trademarks to become such valuable assets. He really cares about his clients and is very strategic – he knows when a fight is winnable and when to let something go.”
D Young & Co LLP

“D Young is just the most amazing IP company – you can leave it all in its hands and you never have to chase a thing.” The firm’s metamorphosis into a comprehensive litigation and prosecution service provider has been a widely followed story on the UK trademark scene and the near-unanimous verdict is that it has managed the transition with phenomenal success. Getting the right people on board to kick-start its contentious division was of paramount importance and it chose wisely with its selection of Ian Starr and Tamsin Holman back in 2011. Most recently, they handled significant litigation for Skechers, including design cases and the successful defence of a High Court appeal. Brand owners come to the ensemble’s London office not only for matters of domestic consequence, but also for its dexterous coordination of multi-jurisdictional disputes in Europe. “A seasoned litigator of the highest calibre, Ian is incredibly knowledgeable about international trademark law. He takes a practical approach to advising clients and never fails to keep their business interests in mind.” “Tamsin is hugely flexible and her attention to detail and steely determination ensure that your brand doesn’t suffer. She is an outstanding professional.” The litigation and prosecution practices dovetail neatly, giving clients the benefit of joined-up thinking on every question. Its large team of trademark attorneys lives and breathes intellectual property and performs with precision for the likes of PepsiCo. Department head Jeremy Pennant and solicitor Matthew Dick take care of the drink and snack sector leader across an increasing number of its key brands and divisions. “Jeremy is fantastic – you won’t find anyone more knowledgeable about your brands and industry.” “His responsiveness is outstanding and he keeps on top of everything in a very proactive way. You can really trust him to have your best interests in mind.” “Matthew appreciates the crucial importance of your marks and provides cost-effective advice that is to the point and easily digestible. When you’re busy running your business, he adopts the right tone to remind you of the steps that you should be taking to strengthen your rights.” Other highly rated members of the team include Jackie Johnson and Helen Cawley. “Clever, articulate, efficient and a beautiful writer”, Johnson is “an absolute pleasure to deal with on a personal and professional level”. “You can always contact her directly and she returns calls quickly if she isn’t immediately available. Her personality and sense of humour make any conversation with her a good part of the day.” Cawley is one of the group’s star performers on oppositions and cancellations.

Dehns
“A great organisation with excellent trademark experience across the board”, fabled outfit Dehns has a sizeable squad of patent and trademark attorneys across several UK locations, as well as in Munich. “A leading light in the trademark world”, Elaine Deyes is the major draw. “Very skilled and efficient, she won’t pursue any points that aren’t worth pursuing – it makes her very cost effective.” She is also “really easy to get on with”.
EIP
EIP joins the WTR 1000 listings this year, on the back of rave reviews from clients. Keeping customer satisfaction at the forefront of their minds, its attorneys respond quickly to out-of-hours requests and – leveraging the expertise of in-house software developers – deliver tailored products in a flexible manner. “EIP is really good to work with – its advice is clear and concise, and avoids any confusion. It makes everything very easy to keep track of.” Its proactivity and commerciality are likewise highlighted. The young, dynamic firm also boasts strong patent credentials – it started out life with a patent focus – and a growing US office, making it a good choice for companies with diverse transatlantic portfolios. Paula Flutter heads the trademark team. Fluent in their language, she attracts a loyal following of German clients, who appreciate her extensive trademark and design savvy and acumen across the contentious/non-contentious divide.
Gill Jennings & Every LLP
London and Munich trademark attorney firm Gill Jennings & Every “always looks for a good business solution to issues – and successfully finds one”. This is why blue-chip brand owners such as Hasbro keep coming back for more. Although it lost the highly rated Mark Devaney to Bone-Knell Symons Intellectual Property in Dubai, it maintains a brilliant team in London, led by Alasdair MacQuarrie. He is “an absolute pleasure to deal with, because he is unfailingly calm and there is no posturing”. According to one foreign associate: “He has handled a lot of opposition, clearance and opinion work for us in Europe and does a very nice job indeed.” A domestic peer puts it simply: “You can trust him to take care of matters.” “Star” Rowena Price is the other top name on the squad. “She is a very high-energy practitioner who takes a personal interest in her clients and develops close relationships.” “Business motived, she is smart and quick to learn what is important to you.” Both MacQuarrie and Price go beyond the usual remit of a trademark attorney and advise not only on prosecution and portfolio management, but also on infringement and anti-counterfeiting issues.
HGF Ltd
HGF is a top 10 filer of EU trademarks among European firms; it also recently bolstered its pan-continental credentials by opening offices in The Hague and Basel. In other news, it has made impressive additions to its team, having recruited Jonathan Thurgood from Carpmaels & Ransford; a dynamic all-rounder in the brands space, Thurgood can be found in the London office. The capital is also home to new WTR 1000 entrant Geoffrey Smith, who “provides practical, cost-effective advice on a timely basis”. Smith can be counted among the few UK attorneys leading the way when it comes to design rights. The firm has talent up and down the country; working out of the Leeds office is head of trademarks David Potter, a veteran protector of household names in the entertainment field. The legal wing of the organisation, HGF Law, works hand in hand with the trademark attorneys, giving clients an efficient, cost-effective one-stop shopping opportunity. Expansion in response to client demand has been a key recent development for both the trademark and patent sides of J A Kemp; staff hires have bolstered its contentious capabilities in particular, while the ribbon was cut on a new office in Cambridge in February 2016. It is “a go-to for UK and European trademark matters – its expert practitioners provide practical advice quickly and for a fair price, and impress at every turn”. Enthusiastic across-the-board feedback puts all four trademark partners in the listings. “Brilliant” James Fish wears the captain’s armband and “has developed a great team”. “His advice stops you wasting time and money, and it is amazing how responsive he is. He is very much on top of all the latest developments and is in it for the long term.” “One of his best attributes is that he is such a decent and approachable chap, and very customer-service focused.” He has been advising cleantech trailblazer Lord Drayson on the adoption of his FREEVOLT trademark. “Ben Mooneapillay has a tremendously keen trademark law mind and provides thoughtful, strategic advice that aligns with the commercial imperatives of clients.” “He is diligent, flexible and very easy to work with, and just a really nice guy, too.” The Oxford-based attorney is the key contact on UK and EU trademark portfolio matters for Electronic Arts. Charlotte Stirling has many admirers across the pond. “She has exacting attention to detail, but never loses sight of the big picture, and that combination is hard to find. She understands your business goals almost as if she were a member of your own in-house team and she is mindful of costs when executing tasks and overseeing her team. When you hit roadblocks, she can find creative solutions and, as a result of her effective communication, coordination with her is seamless.” Tom Albertini is in a good groove managing and giving strategic impetus to fast-moving portfolios, such as that of Just Eat. He is appreciated for his “high-quality service” and “no-nonsense, clear and business-oriented advice”.
Keltie LLP
Unlike more traditional trademark attorney set-ups, “very progressive” Keltie is “run much like the most modern law firms”. Sources applaud its “young, extremely hardworking, dedicated and well-managed team” of professionals. Indeed, two of its rising stars – partners Manuela Macchi and Ben Britter – make their first appearance in the WTR 1000 this year in recognition of their sterling work. Macchi knows what makes for a successful and distinct brand in the pharmaceutical, fashion and sports sectors and manages worldwide portfolios with a sharp commercial eye. Coordinating global search and clearance programmes is the metier of Britter. They are thriving at a firm which “clearly invests in its people”; this is something that founding partner David Keltie – who sadly passed away in 2016 – always keenly promoted. Keltie was “a real equal-opportunities person who never looked down on anyone” and his tradition has very much carried on to this day. Commentators highlight the “excellent internal atmosphere” of a team which has “a great vibe and energy”. Other key contacts are Alistair Gay and Rosemary Cardas. “Hugely experienced” Gay is “one of the leading attorneys in the country”; clients trust his clear, direct approach. Cardas is incredibly versatile, with cutting-edge knowledge of trademark, copyright and design law. Internationally minded, she often quarterbacks global search projects, distributing the ball to the best foreign associates.
Kilburn & Strode LLP
Kilburn & Strode has been making some enviable additions to its already outstanding client base; just two examples include its appointment as global trademark counsel by La Perla Global Management (UK) Limited and a new instruction from Coca-Cola Australia to handle UK and Irish trademark applications. Another notable plotline of late has been the increased sophistication of its general business development, human resources and IT infrastructure – all of which helps to keep it at the vanguard of trademark practice in London. Virtually no other trademark professional gets as much – or as positive – feedback as Iain Stewart. His “to-the-point, business-focused advice”is informed by “strong written and verbal communication skills” and “exceptional knowledge of all issues relating to European and UK trademark practice”. Practice head Carrollanne Lindley also garners enthusiastic praise. “Her succinct advice is commercially sound and she has an encyclopaedic knowledge of trademark registry rules and procedures that you won’t find in others – when you ask her a question, she immediately knows the answer.” Both Stewart and Lindley earn independent recommendations for surrounding themselves with the right people, all of whom are “highly competent experts in their fields who respond rapidly to requests and go above and beyond on time-sensitive matters”. Their mentorship has helped Ryan Pixton to ascend rapidly in the profession. As well as being a rainmaker for the outfit, he is a key relationship partner for many of its most active clients. These include easyGroup, for which he is managing a sweeping Latin American filing programme.
Lane IP
“Lane IP has grown massively – it provides a first-rate trademark attorney service, which is distinguished by its commercial, responsive and modern approach.” “It pays close attention to quality and has very high standards, and it is a really cost-effective option, too.” The firm was set up in 2012 by Steve Lane – “by far one of the most responsive, practical and strategic prosecution and brand enforcement experts you can find in the United Kingdom and the European Union”. “He keenly understands what clients want and need – practical solutions, rather than precedent-setting rulings or a scorched-earth approach. Where a lot of UK counsel take a more traditional approach, Steve and his team are really on the cutting edge.” Natalie Salter is cut from the same cloth as her fellow director. “While others may write a 1,000-page letter saying what you could do, but not the things you should do, Natalie won’t – she cuts to the chase. She understands your business.” When people think of intellectual property in the United Kingdom, they think of Marks & Clerk – it is the largest patent and trademark attorney set-up and the most prolific filer of EU trademarks in the country. Its integration with a solicitors’ firm under the same name also continues to set it apart, even as more attorney outfits push into litigation. A further distinction is its excellence north of the border – Edinburgh-based Campbell Newell runs the most popular trademark team in Scotland – and international capabilities, particularly in Asia. The entire group is in the thick of branding action in many sectors; to take retail, for example, it is working with Next on its trademark portfolio (as it has done for 30-plus years), and also acting for a leading supermarket chain. Mancunian Matthew Sammon captains the UK trademark team and leads its global portfolio management practice. Broad industry knowledge plus honed expertise on internet-related branding matters make him a sage counsellor.
Maucher Jenkins
RGC Jenkins recently merged with Maucher Börjes Jenkins to create a new pan-European IP player. It looks like a strong one, too – both entities had robust practices in their own right. The organisation has offices in several European locations, including London, Munich and Basel, and a Beijing branch – and watch this space for the establishment of additional outposts within the coming months. Peers aver: “You can bet that their clients are getting good, pragmatic advice.” “An experienced trademark attorney with a very international career”, Kana Enomoto is a name to note; she has worked in France, Germany and Japan – and is fluent in the language of each.
Mewburn Ellis LLP
Mewburn Ellis fields a substantial trademark team that makes its presence felt in European IP practice. A commercial take on intellectual property and laser focus on quality are two of its greatest strengths, although there are others for clients to capitalise on – including flexibility, reasonable costs and clear communication. Partner and dispute resolution whizz Sofia Arenal particularly impresses: “She is excellent at investigating enforcement and infringement issues and advises in a way that is very practical. She is also highly responsive.” Having worked in a US law firm on secondment, she has a keen understanding of the approach and mentality of her many US foreign associates; she knows the Japanese market well, too.
Murgitroyd & Company
“One place for all your IP needs” is a slogan that Murgitroyd more than lives up to; it has a staff of more than 250, several international offices – including in the United States – and a striking variety of subject-matter expertise on offer. Leading the trademark group is London’s Mark Hickey, a clearance, registration, enforcement and monetisation expert with a particular faculty for non-traditional trademarks. Registering the shape of Vienetta for Unilever and BP’s green colour are particular accomplishments adorning his CV.
Reddie & Grose LLP
The patent group may be the jewel in the crown of Reddie & Grose, but this long-established firm – steeped in the consumer electronics and broadcasting industries – knows all about trademarks and brands, too. Many of its partners are active in both patents and trademarks, making the set a safe pair of hands for companies with mixed portfolios. Respecting all aspects of prosecution, the people here give “sound commercial advice”. Key contacts include London partners Helen Wakerley and Jan Vleck.
Sipara Ltd
Stakeholders in the IP market continue to be wowed by what they see from Rouse spin-off Sipara. The Oxford-based team has “a common-sense, entrepreneurial attitude” and is “extremely thorough in the work”. It doesn’t use a sledgehammer to crack a nut and is “always reasonable and looking to work out win-win settlements” at the negotiating table. Prosecution and strategy counselling are bread and butter for the team, which has expanded its profile in China significantly this past year; more broadly, the outlook is very international and finding a way for clients to enter new foreign markets is a forte. The ensemble has become a well-oiled service machine following internal training efforts on communication skills, time management and resilience. Founding partner Robert Furneaux has realised his vision for the firm as a welcoming place for employees and clients, and one that is focused on delivering quality above all. The management of trademark and design portfolios is his specialty, although his background in anti-counterfeiting and enforcement is certainly handy when trouble arises. Solicitor and attorney Rebecca Kaye – Furneaux’s co-founder – is an authority on intellectual property in the retail world. Foreign associates describe her as “bright, thorough and effective”. Three-plus decades spent in law firms, in-house and at trademark attorney outfits distinguish Nick Baker, whose experience is a boon to any brand owner.
Stobbs IP Limited
The “amazing growth” of Stobbs IP has been one of the key developments in the UK trademark landscape in recent years. Established in 2013 with a staff of 18, it now has 51 employees on board, including 28 fee earners. “It is doing great things in the space between a law firm, agency and brand consultancy”, giving “practical, commercial, down-to-earth advice that is reasonable and doesn’t cost the earth”. It does things a little differently by partnering closely with clients, engaging with their business and acting as broad-spectrum brand advisers. This is why it is so successful at large-scale projects – assisting Macmillan Publishers and Springer Nature on brand review in connection with a new joint venture and on post-union portfolio management is one recent example; managing the global trademark and design portfolio of Tesco is another. The firm has always done litigation, but hasn’t shouted about it; however, it is gaining serious traction in this arena, with several qualified solicitors on hand. “It isn’t a case of saying, ‘Let’s speak to counsel’ as soon as something becomes difficult – these guys get stuck in.” Virgin Enterprises leverages the set’s broad expertise, relying on it as primary trademark adviser and online enforcement watchdog. The team cut its teeth at the IP Enterprise Court and continues to be visible there, recently representing Camden Town Brewery in a passing-off claim against Craft Brewing Company. Man of the hour Julius Stobbs has a sterling reputation; interviewees extol him as “helpful and well organised”, “strategic and responsive” and “excellent on EU trademarks”. Emma Pettipher also wins laurels, particularly for her profound understanding of European trademark protection. “She is very active within the International Trademark Association and it’s always a pleasure to see her – she knows exactly what she is talking about.”
Venner Shipley LLP
Patent and trademark attorney outfit Venner Shipley made an interesting play in May 2016, adding legal capabilities with the recruitment of James Tumbridge and Paul Harris from US player Pillsbury. With many brand owners now seeking to capitalise on the efficiencies of a one-stop shop, the move made sense – and it was well executed. Harris and Tumbridge are “bright, dynamic and ambitious” litigators who are all about getting results, whatever form those may take. Coming straight out of an international firm, they bring deep experience of multi-jurisdictional disputes which maps well on to their new firm’s pan-European trademark protection practice.
Withers & Rogers
“Withers & Rogers is an energetic firm with an impressive and growing practice.” Always up to date on industry trends, its trademark team supports clients in ways that are eminently meaningful from a business perspective. This makes it a popular destination for prosecution briefs – it places fifth in this year’s filing statistics. Newly ranked this year is Tania Clark, a trademark attorney and qualified barrister with a robust contentious and non-contentious practice. She knows all the ins and outs of protecting trademarks through international channels.

Individuals: anti-counterfeiting

Stuart Adams - Rouse IP Ltd
Gary Assim - Shoosmiths LLP
Simon Ayrton - Powell Gilbert LLP
Jeremy Hertzog - Mishcon de Reya LLP
Charles Lloyd - Taylor Wessing LLP
Roland Mallinson - Taylor Wessing LLP
Jeremy Newman - Rouse IP Ltd
Alexandra Pygall - Stephenson Harwood
Paul Rawlinson - Baker McKenzie LLP
Simon Tracey - Bear & Wolf

Individuals: enforcement and litigation

Joel Barry - Olswang LLP
Nick Bolter - Cooley LLP
Peter Brownlow - Bird & Bird LLP
Anna Carboni - Redd Solicitors LLP
Neville Cordell - Allen & Overy LLP
Roland Mallinson - Taylor Wessing LLP
Paul Rawlinson - Baker McKenzie LLP
David A Stone - Allen & Overy LLP
Paul Walsh - Bristows LLP
Sara L Ashby - Redd Solicitors LLP
Simon Ayrton - Powell Gilbert LLP
Mary Bagnall - Charles Russell Speechlys LLP
Simon Bennett - Fox Williams LLP
Ray Black - Mishcon de Reya LLP
Alexandra Brodie - Gowling WLG
Simon Chapman - Lewis Silkin
Simon Clark - Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
Iain Connor - Pinsent Masons LLP
David Cran - RPC
Giles Crown - Lewis Silkin
Jeremy Dickerson - Burges Salmon LLP
Jeremy Drew - RPC
Huw Evans - Norton Rose Fulbright LLP
Sarah Hadland - SH & Associates IP Ltd
Michael L Hart - Baker McKenzie LLP
Guy Heath - Nabarro LLP
Jeremy Hertzog - Mishcon de Reya LLP
Tamsin Holman - D Young & Co LLP
Cerryg Jones - Gowling WLG
Ian Kirby - Carpmaels & Ransford LLP
Charles Lloyd - Taylor Wessing LLP
Eifion Morris - Stephenson Harwood
Helen Newman - Olswang LLP
John Olsen - Locke Lord LLP
Alexandra Pygall - Stephenson Harwood
Jason Rawkins - Taylor Wessing LLP
David Rose - Mishcon de Reya LLP
Nick P Rose - Fieldfisher LLP
Theo Savvides - Bristows LLP
Tom Scourfield - CMS UK
Michael Skrein - Reed Smith
Joel Smith - Herbert Smith Freehills LLP
Adrian H Smith - Simmons & Simmons LLP
Ian C Starr - D Young & Co LLP
Katharine Stephens - Bird & Bird LLP
Kate Swaine - Gowling WLG
Simon Tracey - Bear & Wolf
David Wilkinson - Clyde & Co LLP
Stuart Adams - Rouse IP Ltd
Nick Aries - Bird & Bird LLP
Gary Assim - Shoosmiths LLP
Jill Bainbridge - Blake Morgan
Rachael Barber - Penningtons Manches LLP
Ian Bartlett - Beck Greener
Jeremy Blum - Bristows LLP
Leighton Cassidy - Fieldfisher LLP
Mark Daniels - Browne Jacobson LLP
Jonathan Day - Carpmaels & Ransford LLP
Ian De Freitas - Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
Michael Gardner - Wedlake Bell
Kirsten Gilbert - Marks & Clerk Solicitors LLP
Robert Guthrie - Osborne Clarke LLP
Gordon Harris - Gowling WLG
Paul A Harris - Venner Shipley LLP
Mark Heritage - Bear & Wolf
Ruth Hoy - DLA Piper UK LLP
Robert Jacob - Stephenson Harwood
Emma Lenthall - Reed Smith
Simon Levine - DLA Piper UK LLP
Tom Lingard - Stevens & Bolton LLP
John Linneker - Dentons
Ian Lowe - Nabarro LLP
Jeremy Newman - Rouse IP Ltd
David Parrish - Nabarro LLP
Carolyn E Pepper - Reed Smith
Arty Rajendra - Rouse IP Ltd
Hiroshi J Sheraton - Baker McKenzie LLP
Mark Shillito - Herbert Smith Freehills LLP
Paul Stevens - Olswang LLP
Florian Traub - Squire Patton Boggs (UK) LLP
Chris Tulley - DLA Piper UK LLP
James R Tumbridge - Venner Shipley LLP
John Wilks - DLA Piper UK LLP
Charlie Winckworth - Hogan Lovells International LLP
Catherine Wolfe - Boult Wade Tennant
Sarah Wright - Olswang LLP

Individuals: prosecution and strategy

Nick Bolter - Cooley LLP
Jonathan Clegg - Cleveland
Guy Heath - Nabarro LLP
Mark Hiddleston - Hiddleston Trade Marks
Mark Holah - Bird & Bird LLP
Steven Jennings - Lewis Silkin
Steve Lane - Lane IP
Carrollanne Lindley - Kilburn & Strode LLP
Roland Mallinson - Taylor Wessing LLP
Helen Newman - Olswang LLP
John Olsen - Locke Lord LLP
Jeremy Pennant - D Young & Co LLP
Tony Pluckrose - Boult Wade Tennant
Allan Poulter - Bird & Bird LLP
Rowena Price - Gill Jennings & Every LLP
Paul Rawlinson - Baker McKenzie LLP
Iain Stewart - Kilburn & Strode LLP
Julius Stobbs - Stobbs IP Limited
David A Stone - Allen & Overy LLP
Paul Walsh - Bristows LLP
Catherine Wolfe - Boult Wade Tennant
Tom Albertini - J A Kemp
Tracy Arch - Barker Brettell
Joel Barry - Olswang LLP
Ray Black - Mishcon de Reya LLP
Peter Brownlow - Bird & Bird LLP
Rosemary Cardas - Keltie LLP
Simon Clark - Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
Declan Cushley - Browne Jacobson LLP
France Delord - Taylor Wessing LLP
Elaine Deyes - Dehns
Dominic Farnsworth - Lewis Silkin
James Fish - J A Kemp
Mark Foreman - Rouse IP Ltd
Robert Furneaux - Sipara Ltd
Alistair Gay - Keltie LLP
Louise Gellman - Nabarro LLP
Ian Gruselle - Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
Sarah Hadland - SH & Associates IP Ltd
Mark Hickey - Murgitroyd & Company
Felicity K Hide - Boult Wade Tennant
Lorna Hobbs - Cleveland
Keith Howick - Carpmaels & Ransford LLP
Paul Jordan - Bristows LLP
Rebecca Kaye - Sipara Ltd
Sarah Lait - Barker Brettell
Jessica Le Gros - Baker McKenzie LLP
Alasdair MacQuarrie - Gill Jennings & Every LLP
Chris McLeod - Elkington & Fife LLP
Ben Mooneapillay - J A Kemp
Kate O'Rourke - Charles Russell Speechlys LLP
Jeffrey Parker - Jeffrey Parker & Company
Emma Pitcher - Boult Wade Tennant
Ryan Pixton - Kilburn & Strode LLP
Jason Rawkins - Taylor Wessing LLP
David Rose - Mishcon de Reya LLP
Matthew Sammon - Marks & Clerk
Geoffrey Smith - HGF Ltd
Adrian H Smith - Simmons & Simmons LLP
Katharine Stephens - Bird & Bird LLP
Kate Swaine - Gowling WLG
Simon Tracey - Bear & Wolf
John M Wallace - Boult Wade Tennant
Imogen Wiseman - Cleveland
Catherine Wiseman - Barker Brettell
Sofia Arenal - Mewburn Ellis LLP
Arthur Artinian - K&L Gates
Jill Bainbridge - Blake Morgan
Nick Baker - Sipara Ltd
Ian Bartlett - Beck Greener
Simon Bennett - Fox Williams LLP
Christopher Benson - Taylor Wessing LLP
Simon Bentley - Abel & Imray
Ben Britter - Keltie LLP
Sally Britton - Mishcon de Reya LLP
Leighton Cassidy - Fieldfisher LLP
Helen Cawley - D Young & Co LLP
Tania Clark - Withers & Rogers
James Cornish - Page White and Farrer
Paul Cox - Clarke Willmott LLP
Jonathan Day - Carpmaels & Ransford LLP
Matthew Dick - D Young & Co LLP
Louisa Dixon - Taylor Vinters
Charlotte Duly - Boult Wade Tennant
Kana Enomoto - Maucher Jenkins
Ben Evans - Blake Morgan
Tom Farrand - Novagraaf
Désirée Fields - DLA Piper UK LLP
Paula Flutter - EIP
Ian Gill - AA Thornton & Co
Hastings Guise - Fieldfisher LLP
Robert Guthrie - Osborne Clarke LLP
Michael L Hart - Baker McKenzie LLP
Mark Heritage - Bear & Wolf
Peter Houlihan - Cleveland
Emmy Hunt - Redd Solicitors LLP
Jackie Johnson - D Young & Co LLP
Manish Joshi - Joshi Worldwide IP
Sahira Khwaja - Hogan Lovells International LLP
Joanne Larkey - Cleveland
Vanessa Lawrence - AA Thornton & Co
Charles Lloyd - Taylor Wessing LLP
Roger Lush - Carpmaels & Ransford LLP
Manuela Macchi - Keltie LLP
Mark Owen - Taylor Wessing LLP
Emma Pettipher - Stobbs IP Limited
David Potter - HGF Ltd
Natalie Salter - Lane IP
Jonathan Thurgood - HGF Ltd
Florian Traub - Squire Patton Boggs (UK) LLP
Chris Tulley - DLA Piper UK LLP
Louise Westbury - Cleveland
Charlie Winckworth - Hogan Lovells International LLP
Sarah Wright - Olswang LLP

Individuals: transactions

Mark Abell - Bird & Bird LLP
Laura Anderson - Bristows LLP
Nick Aries - Bird & Bird LLP
Arthur Artinian - K&L Gates
Joel Barry - Olswang LLP
Simon Bennett - Fox Williams LLP
Michelle L Blunt - Baker McKenzie LLP
David Bond - Fieldfisher LLP
Nicola Broadhurst - Stevens & Bolton LLP
Simon Chalkley - Redd Solicitors LLP
Declan Cushley - Browne Jacobson LLP
Jim Ford - Allen & Overy LLP
Michael Gavey - Simmons & Simmons LLP
Guy Heath - Nabarro LLP
Paul Joseph - RPC
Sahira Khwaja - Hogan Lovells International LLP
Rohan Massey - Ropes & Gray LLP
Anthony Misquitta - Keystone Law Ltd
Nigel Parker - Allen & Overy LLP
Jennifer Pierce - Charles Russell Speechlys LLP
Alexandra Pygall - Stephenson Harwood
Tamara Quinn - Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP
Helen Scott-Lawler - Burges Salmon LLP
Stephen L Sidkin - Fox Williams LLP
Adrian H Smith - Simmons & Simmons LLP
Joel Smith - Herbert Smith Freehills LLP
Alex Watt - Browne Jacobson LLP
Sarah Wright - Olswang LLP

United Kingdom: England: The Bar

Sets

H
11 South Square
8 New Square
Hogarth Chambers
One Essex Court
Three New Square
11 South Square
Piers Acland QC is, despite his seniority, very approachable and excellent with clients.” The top-flight patent litigator “gives clear and concise advice” when it comes to trademarks, too. The “highly persuasive” Henry Carr QC has many appearances before the ECJ to his name. “Commercial, analytical, accessible and decisive” are some of the words used to describe Hugo Cuddigan QC. “He is an excellent all-round advocate, suitable for any IP case.” “Extremely bright and tenacious”, is the verdict on award-winning IP silk Iain Purvis QC. He is brilliant on brands, but has a nuanced technical understanding that gives him an edge in disputes over patents and technology. Michael Silverleaf QC has a physics background and is a go-to for some of the most technically challenging patent disputes, but undertakes complex trademark work, too. He is a leading alternative dispute resolution expert and accredited mediator. The “creative and bright” Mark Vanhegan QC is endorsed for his “astute commercial analysis” and “smooth advocacy skills”. One of the busiest juniors is Chris Aikens – he is in demand because he’s “so hands on”. “Chris understands his clients’ business needs and is very commercial.” Tom Alkin is “always calm and balanced, and provides accurate, practical advice succinctly”. Benet Brandreth is one of the most specialised trademark barristers in the business, with an outstanding knowledge of EU Intellectual Property Office procedural issues and other nuanced topics which are important to brand owners. “He is a determined advocate, excellent on his feet and great at persuading judges.” On top of that, “he is personable, user friendly and puts clients at ease”. Instructing lawyers call Anna Edwards-Stuart “a very fast worker who gives quality advice quickly”. Anyone with trademark, data protection or confidential information concerns would be wise to seek out Jacqueline Reid. She is also gaining recognition for her work on designs and copyright cases.
8 New Square
Daniel Alexander QC is an all-round IP sage who has handled many a headline-grabbing trademark case at the European Court of Justice (ECJ). “Brilliant advocate” John Baldwin QC has “a good nose for a winning strategy”. “Cerebral” silk Martin Howe QC is “great on paper, but even better as an advocate”: “He is highly respected by the judiciary and a real team player.” “Phenomenally hardworking advocate” Andrew Lykiardopoulos QC is “thorough and detailed in his approach to complex factual and legal matters”, “excellent with clients” and “highly persuasive”. Cross-border patent litigation is the preserve of Richard Meade QC, a frighteningly clever advocate who can quickly crunch through weighty technical disputes; when he takes his talents to a trademark case, wonderful things tend to happen. Tom Moody-Stuart QC took silk in 2016. “He’s a great scrapper”, but also “well suited to a subtle passing off-style case where you need to tell a good story”. James Mellor QC is “right on top of all the law and comes across as a true authority”. “He is excellent to have by your side on commercially important cases” and is “probably the most respected trademark practitioner at the Bar”. “Innovative thinker” Adrian Speck QC is “at his best on difficult cases involving novel issues”. Michael Tappin QC is at the vanguard of life sciences patent litigation in the United Kingdom, but also has plenty of trademark wins on his résumé. A “brilliant strategist” and “winning choice for cases that require a forensic mind”, James Abrahams is warmly endorsed by instructing solicitors. The “thorough, no-nonsense” Jessie Bowhill is a classical pianist who has turned her passion for music into a brilliant career at the Bar handling copyright cases in the music world. Fiona Clark is one of the most experienced barristers, silk or junior, in the country. She is “personable and approachable” and “comes up with very persuasive arguments”. In the eight years since she was called to the Bar, Isabel Jamal has kept getting better and better. “She has an extremely mature understanding of brands” and “her written advocacy is crystal clear”. Lindsay Lane impresses in every respect: “She’s on top of all the detail, great on conference calls with clients and pragmatic and commercial in her tactics”. Jaani Riordan is another rising star on deck at 8 New Square. “Responsive and committed”, he is making a name for himself among instructing lawyers; having previously worked as a solicitor, he knows what the expectations are.
Hogarth Chambers
“Calm” is a word that appears in many of the references gathered for Roger Wyand QC, an “authority on UK and European trademark law issues”. “Quick and incisive”, and “excellent at skeleton argument preparation”, he has been engaged on a number of key trademark cases in recent years. Richard Davis is recommended for his patent and designs expertise in particular, but he is comfortably at home on complex trademark disputes; so too copyright guru Gwilym Harbottle. “Exceptionally smart, while also commercial and practical”, Michael Hicks is always in demand. Passionate about maths and science, no case is too technical for Benjamin Longstaff; often on the frontlines of complex patent cases, he is also a frequent flier in trademark contentions. Amanda Michaels has had a heavily trademark-biased workload this past year, balanced between court, advisory and registry work. She has a “well-developed international perspective” on trademarks and understands how to run multi-jurisdictional cases so that results in one country benefit proceedings in another. “Her forensic approach works well for the trickiest cases.” Andrew Norris “goes the extra mile” and is “a leading light of the IP Bar”. “He provides a perfect balance of technically sound yet commercially practical advice” and has “a great sense of humour” to go along with it all. Tom St Quintin “thinks through all the issues in a very level-headed way” and is “simply very effective”. Guy Tritton makes his WTR 1000 debut this year. The author of Tritton on Intellectual Property in Europe, he is as substantively knowledgeable as they come and “particularly adept on soft IP issues”.
One Essex Court
“Leading authority on trademarks” Emma Himsworth QC is recommended by many sources for her sheer technical excellence. She is leading from the front on cutting-edge branding issues such as plain packaging. One of the country’s best IP juniors, Guy Hollingworth also happens to be an accomplished conjurer. He shows his sleight of hand in the courtroom, where he is “unflappable” and “excellent at presenting in a focused and clear way”. “He is a considered and measured speaker and writer, and very user friendly.” Another “top junior” is e-commerce and domain name expert Philip Roberts.
Three New Square
Douglas Campbell QC made silk in 2016. “Tenacious, proactive and committed, as well as easy to engage with, he is a leading light in the field.” Thomas Hinchliffe QC has a litany of patent victories to his name, but is as versatile as they come and adept on any case involving intellectual property. “Extraordinarily brilliant advocate and extremely client friendly”, Tom Mitcheson QC impresses everyone who crosses his path. “He is good for unusual trademark cases, especially those involving extended passing off and geographical indications.” No barrister receives more recommendations than Simon Malynicz QC: “He is in a league of his own right now.” With “unsurpassed knowledge of international trademark law”, “he is one of a new breed of barristers who are much more collaborative and engaged than more traditional types who dictate what to do”. “Clever, practical and committed”, Stuart Baran is “a rising star who is a great asset to any team”. “Nothing is too much trouble for him.” Denise McFarland is one of the more soft IP-focused advocates in the tables and she is excellent, too – “superb with clients, practical and commercial”.

Senior counsel

Daniel Alexander QC - 8 New Square
John Baldwin QC - 8 New Square
Henry Carr QC - 11 South Square
Emma Himsworth QC - One Essex Court
Simon Malynicz QC - Three New Square
James Mellor QC - 8 New Square
Iain Purvis QC - 11 South Square
Piers Acland QC - 11 South Square
Michael Bloch QC - Blackstone Chambers
Douglas Campbell QC - Three New Square
Hugo Cuddigan QC - 11 South Square
Michael Edenborough QC - Serle Court
Thomas Hinchliffe QC - Three New Square
Martin Howe QC - 8 New Square
Andrew Lykiardopoulos QC - 8 New Square
Richard Meade QC - 8 New Square
Tom Mitcheson QC - Three New Square
Tom Moody-Stuart QC - 8 New Square
Michael Silverleaf QC - 11 South Square
Adrian Speck QC - 8 New Square
Michael Tappin QC - 8 New Square
Mark Vanhegan QC - 11 South Square
Roger Wyand QC - Hogarth Chambers

Junior counsel

Benet X Brandreth - 11 South Square
Anna Edwards-Stuart - 11 South Square
Michael Hicks - Hogarth Chambers
Guy Hollingworth - One Essex Court
Amanda Michaels - Hogarth Chambers
Andrew Norris - Hogarth Chambers
Philip Roberts - One Essex Court
James Abrahams - 8 New Square
Chris Aikens - 11 South Square
Tom Alkin - 11 South Square
Stuart Baran - Three New Square
Jessie Bowhill - 8 New Square
Fiona Clark - 8 New Square
Richard Davis - Hogarth Chambers
Gwilym Harbottle - Hogarth Chambers
Isabel Jamal - 8 New Square
Victoria Jones - 3PB Barristers
Lindsay Lane - 8 New Square
Benjamin Longstaff - Hogarth Chambers
Denise McFarland - Three New Square
Jacqueline Reid - 11 South Square
Jaani Riordan - 8 New Square
Tom St Quintin - Hogarth Chambers
Guy Tritton - Hogarth Chambers
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Issue 69